FAQs


How Do I Know If I Have A Hearing Loss?
A: Most hearing loss occurs gradually, so the symptoms are often difficult to recognize. It might be time to consult an Audiologist if you are experiencing one or more of the following problems:

  • People seem to be mumbling
    You have to strain to hear when someone talks or whispers
    You have difficulty hearing someone call from behind or from another room
    You need to watch a speaker’s lips more closely to follow conversation
    Following a conversation is difficult when you’re in a group of people, for example at a meeting, at church, or during lectures
    You have to turn up the volume on the TV or radio
    You have problems hearing clearly on the telephone
    You have difficulty hearing at the theatre, cinema, or other entertainment venues
    It’s hard to hear in noisy environments, for example in a restaurant or in a car
    You have begun to limit you social activities due to difficulty hearing and communicating
    Family, friends, or colleagues mention that they often have to repeat themselves

What Is A Hearing Evaluation?

A: The Audiologist will begin by exploring your medical and hearing history. Your audiologist will then examine your ear visually(otoscopy), test the mobility of your eardrum, and check the pressure in the middles ear. He will perform a thorough hearing test including speech and pure tone testing to determine the extent of your hearing loss.

What Is An Audiogram?
A: An audiogram is a visual representation of your actual hearing. It usually measures hearing graphically at the frequencies 250Hz 500 Hz 1000Hz 2000Hz 4000Hz 6000Hz and 8000Hz. The decibel level at which you hear at each frequency determines whether your hearing in the normal range or if you exhibit a loss.

Why Should I Wear Hearing Aids?
A: Hearing loss is one of the most common conditions in the world. Most hard-of-hearing people can benefit from modern hearing aids, as they can significantly improve the users ability to understand speech in easy and difficult listening situations.

Will My Hearing Aids Be Noticable?
A: The new digital technology allows manufacurers to produce a hearing device which is significantly smaller than the hearing aids of the past. Hearing aids come in many shapes, sizes, and even colors; many almost invisible to the naked eye. Depending on the severity of your loss your audiologist may be able to fit you with an aid so small, you will be the only one who knows it is in your ear!

Why Should I See An Audiologist Instead Of A Hearing Aid Dispenser?
A: An Audiologist has a doctorate degree in hearing sciences making him experienced in a variety of hearing issues. An Audiologist may have a larger referral base for ear disorders. Most insurance companies will pay an Audiologist whereas they won’t pay a Hearing Aid Dispenser for covered services.

My Doctor Says I Have Nerve Damage Will A Hearing Aid Help Me?
A: The nerve damage you are referring to is most likely called Sensorineural Hearing Loss, this kind of nerve damage is the most common type of hearing loss that will benefit from hearing aid.